John Milton

On this day in 1667, the poet John Milton (books by this author) sold the copyright for his masterpiece, Paradise Lost, for 10 pounds. Milton had championed the cause of Oliver Cromwell and the Parliament over the king during the English Civil War, and published a series of radical pamphlets in support of such things as Puritanism, freedom of the press, divorce on the basis of incompatibility, and the execution of King Charles I. With the overthrow of the monarchy and the creation of the Commonwealth, Milton was named Secretary of Foreign Tongues, and though he eventually lost his eyesight, he was able to carry out his duties with the help of aides like fellow poet Andrew Marvell.

When the monarchy was restored in 1660, Milton was imprisoned as a traitor and stripped of his property. He was soon released, but was now impoverished as well as completely blind, and he spent the rest of his life secluded in a cottage in Buckinghamshire. This is where he dictated Paradise Lost -an epic poem about the Fall of Man, with Satan as a kind of antihero – and its sequel,Paradise Regained, about the temptation of Christ.

The Writer’s Almanac for April 27, 2016‏


About The Author

DiBuduo is also the author of "Crime A Day," a nonfiction book, "A Penis Manologue: One Man's Response to the Vagina Monologues," and two volumes of his signature "flash-fiction poetry," as well as several collections of short stories. His short fiction and poetry also appear in anthologies, online journals, and recently, in Weekend Reads, a collection appropriately subtitled "Twisted Stories, Twisted Mind!" He has completed two paranormal novels, "Cryonic Man" and The Mountain Will Cover You.” and the soon to be released novel, “The Chicagoua Café,” and also a collaborative collection of connected fantasy stories with author Kate Robinson. Read more about DiBuduo and his interests at joedibuduo.com.

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